install like a pro

stringing your TMT is easy! Follow along with these pictures for a perfect pocket every time!


Top String

Top Left of Sidewall

Top Left of Sidewall

Knot and Loop

Take your top string from the Shooter Bundle and tie a knot leaving an inch or so on the end. Loop the string through the top sidewall hole once. Then loop through the first top string hole as shown!

First hole in scoop

First hole in scoop

Through the Leather

Next guide the long tip of the string through the hole in the top of the leather. It should go through the same hole as the cross lace does. Slide the leather up close to your first loop.

First hole in scoop

First hole in scoop

Loop Again

Lastly loop through the same hole as before but in reverse. Make sure this knot is as tight as possible make it to ensure peak preformance. Repeat these steps 3 more times and tie off your top string!


Crosslace knots

 
Bottom Left of Sidewall

Bottom Left of Sidewall

Find the Knots

After the finishing the top string, find all of the places where the crosslace is tied to a sidewall string. They will always be located in the top or bottom of the crosslace. Depending on number of colors there may ber up to 4 of these knots!

Bottom Left of Sidewall

Bottom Left of Sidewall

Untie and Retie

One by one, untie the crosslace from around the sidewall. There should be 2 knots to undo. Then thread the crosslace through through either the top or bottom sidewall hole, which ever its closest too. Lastly, secure the string by tying a knot snug to the plastic.

 

Secure LEathers

 
Inside of Bottom Holes

Inside of Bottom Holes

From the Inside

This is the bottom holes from the inside of the lacrosse head. If you've done the previous steps properly you will see the leathers draped over the back of the throat. Should resemble the above picture.

Inside of Bottom Holes

Inside of Bottom Holes

Thread them Through

Thread the end of each leather through the corresponding hole. Pull all the leathers so the pocket is less then ball depth.In the above picture the leathers have been removed in the back to show detail.

 

SidewallS

Outside of Sidewall

Outside of Sidewall

Pull out Sidewall

Take one end of the sidewall and gently start pulling on it. It should slip out from the crosslace loops easily. If it catches, spin the string in your fingers and continue to pull until the entire string is removed.

Outside of Sidewall

Outside of Sidewall

Interlocks and Loops

Tie a knot in the end of the sidewall and thread it through the most top hole it will fit in. Thread the sidewall string through the first empty crosslace loop making sure it stays looped. Then loop the sidewall string through next sidewall hole and interlock as shown in the image above, Continue making sure you thread through every single crosslace loop. Keep them evenly spaced keeping the diamond shapes in the lace.


TIe off LEathers

 
Back of Throat

Back of Throat

Wrap around Plastic

If you properly secured your leathers it should be straight  forward to loop themback up through the gaps between them like the picture above. Then wrap the leathers around the plastic based on your head.

Back of Throat

Back of Throat

Tie some Knots

The aim of wrapping the leathers around the plastic is so that ideally you can double themback and tie knots on the back of the throat. Tie the outer 2 leathers together in a Box Knot. Repeat with inners.

 

ShootinG Strings

Front of Pocket

Front of Pocket

There is no "Right" way to weave a shooting string but here is an example of what we suggest for ideal preformance. What makes this style so effective is that it is woven strictly around the leathers and behind the crosslace. Repeat this technique with cotton and cords for desired release!


Finishing touches

Trim all strings that are over 2 inches including the leathers. Be sure to not cut anything to short in case you need to adjust. The pocket should be formed and ready for more shaping and break in. Subscibe to our YouTube for information on Maintence and Break In!

           Special Thanks to Tom

           Special Thanks to Tom